Linda C Brigham

Linda C Brigham is Associate Professor and Department Head in the Department of English at Kansas State University. She is a frequent contributor to ebr.

The Interface As A Form Of Artificial Life


In response to Bill Wilson’s provocation (about not “getting through” to a younger audience), Linda Brigham introduces a cognitive perspective and closes with a metaphor from music - eventually the design-governing metaphor for the site design.

How Are We Going To Kill Information?


Responding to the potential for having “all of ebr current” and even viewable on a single screen, Brigham wonders if it might not be better to kill off content. Brigham’s model is the Blair Witch project.

Feeding the Global Spider


Linda Brigham sees Zygmunt Bauman’s Globalization: The Human Consequences as a provocative introduction to our current environmental and economic predicament.

Further Notes From the Prison-House of Language


Linda Brigham works through Embodying Technesis by Mark Hansen.

Taking It IS Dishing It Out: The Late Modern Logic of Fight Club


Linda Brigham breaks the first rule of Fight Club and talks about what the movie industry keeps secret - not male masochism, anti-corporate terrorism, self-help, or even heterosexual anxiety, but how best to deliver a commodity that doesn’t act like one.

Are We Posthuman Yet?


Linda Brigham reads How We Became Posthuman the way Katherine Hayles reads novels: as a story that resists both linearity and the analytical ardor of attempts at humanist ordering.

Hollywood Nomadology?


Linda Brigham offers a Deleuzean take on Independence Day.

Cyberinthian Ways


Linda Brigham hypercontextualizes contemporary philosophy.

Academia, Inc.


Linda Brigham reviews Incorporations, the most recent collection from Zone Books.

Observing the Observers of Systems and Environments


Linda Brigham reviews the Spring and Fall 1995 issues of Cultural Critique.

Networking the Multitude


Linda C Brigham complicates Hardt and Negri’s case for network resistance.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Mothers?


Linda Brigham reviews Katherine Hayles’ My Mother was a Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts.