Tag: espen aarseth

Interactive Fiction

2005-04-17

Which alias best fits interactive fiction?
The nominees are:
“Story,” “Game,” “Storygame,” “Novel,” “World,”
“Literature,” “Puzzle,” “Problem,” “Riddle,” and “Machine.”
Read, and decide.

The Pleasures of Immersion and Interaction

2004-11-04

J. Yellowlees Douglas and Andrew Hargadon on the affective side of hypertexts via “schemas, scripts, and the fifth business.”

Towards Computer Game Studies

2004-05-22

Literature scholars eager to understand gaming have made early inroads. Markku Eskelinen sets up serious checkpoints.

A Preliminary Poetics

2004-05-01

The builder of Façade, an “interactive story world,” Michael Mateas offers both a poetics and a neo-Aristotelian project (for interactive drama and games).

Janet Murray responds in turn

2004-05-02

Animals and invaders populate the space of Janet Murray’s counter-response.

Card Shark and Thespis

2004-11-06

Eastgate Systems alumns Diane Greco and Mark Bernstein explain two “exotic tools for hypertext narrative.”

Henry Jenkins responds in turn

2004-01-09

Casting the ludology vs. narratology debate as a game in itself, Henry Jenkins brings Bible gardens and the duck-billed platypus into this defense of hybridity.

Markku Eskelinen's response

2004-01-09

Even orienteering is of greater use to game designers than narratology, claims Marrku Eskelinen, heading towards an area free from stories once more.

John Cayley's response

2005-05-21

“Playing with play,” John Cayley sets ludology on an even playing field with literature, but without literary scholarship’s over-reliance on ‘story,’ ‘closure,’ and ‘pleasure.’

From Work to Play

2004-05-20

Stuart Moulthrop (re)mediates the interpretation (narrativists) vs. configuration (ludologists) debate by going macropolitical.

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