Tag: espen aarseth

Interactive Fiction


Which alias best fits interactive fiction?
The nominees are:
“Story,” “Game,” “Storygame,” “Novel,” “World,”
“Literature,” “Puzzle,” “Problem,” “Riddle,” and “Machine.”
Read, and decide.

The Pleasures of Immersion and Interaction


J. Yellowlees Douglas and Andrew Hargadon on the affective side of hypertexts via “schemas, scripts, and the fifth business.”

Towards Computer Game Studies


Literature scholars eager to understand gaming have made early inroads. Markku Eskelinen sets up serious checkpoints.

A Preliminary Poetics


The builder of Façade, an “interactive story world,” Michael Mateas offers both a poetics and a neo-Aristotelian project (for interactive drama and games).

Janet Murray responds in turn


Animals and invaders populate the space of Janet Murray’s counter-response.

Card Shark and Thespis


Eastgate Systems alumns Diane Greco and Mark Bernstein explain two “exotic tools for hypertext narrative.”

Henry Jenkins responds in turn


Casting the ludology vs. narratology debate as a game in itself, Henry Jenkins brings Bible gardens and the duck-billed platypus into this defense of hybridity.

Markku Eskelinen's response


Even orienteering is of greater use to game designers than narratology, claims Marrku Eskelinen, heading towards an area free from stories once more.

John Cayley's response


“Playing with play,” John Cayley sets ludology on an even playing field with literature, but without literary scholarship’s over-reliance on ‘story,’ ‘closure,’ and ‘pleasure.’

From Work to Play


Stuart Moulthrop (re)mediates the interpretation (narrativists) vs. configuration (ludologists) debate by going macropolitical.