Tag: film

Jon McKenzie's response (excerpt)

2004-01-09

An appreciative reply that measures the incline of Henry Jenkins’ middle ground.

"With each project I find myself reimagining what cinema might be": An Interview with Zoe Beloff

2011-10-24

Jussi Parikka interviews artist Zoe Beloff about her relationship to the emerging set of interdisciplinary theories and methodologies known as media archaeology. In way of response, Beloff discusses some past works, including: Lost (1995), Shadow Land (2000), Claire and Don in Slumberland (2002), Charming Augustine (2005), The Somnambulists (2008), and The Dream Films (2009).

Tank Girl, Postfeminist Media Manifesto

2005-01-24

Elyce Helford frames Tank Girl as a portrait of the postfeminist woman: hyper-individualist and hyper-sexual - a woman who is quite comfortable in popular cinema but not so much so in reality.

Victoria Vesna responds

2004-05-01

In response to Perlin, Victoria Vesna reiterates the unique realism of games.

The Godfather Seen Through The Lens of Elite Criticism (and Vice Versa)

2003-01-15

Chris Messenger achieves a rare convergence of elite and popular cultural criticism by doing for The Godfather (and its spinoffs) what previous critics have done for Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Hope for Empowerment, Fear of Control

1999-12-30

Jan van Looy reviews Silvio Gaggi on hypertext fiction up to the early ’90s.

Friedrich Kittler's Technosublime

1999-12-30

Bruce Clarke reviews the new translation of Grammophone, Film, Typewriter, a requiem and good-riddance for the era of so-called Man.

New Media and Old: The Limits of Continuity

2002-08-20

Lev Manovich makes the first sustained case for a new media theory, but with cinema as his starting point he has a hard time engaging the non-representational artforms and aural explorations to be found there. So argues the Australian media writer, geniwate.

Stuttering Screams and Beastly Poetry

2001-09-01

Allison Hunter writes on Douglas Kahn, a modern musicologist who takes in the noise of modern battle, recordings from the tops of trains and the interiors of coalmines, and the musicality of undigitized everyday noise.