Tag:

Parasitic Fiction

2008-03-09

Stephen Burn considers Tom LeClair’s recent novel through the lens of the latter’s own critical work on postmodern fiction, while also excavating the novel’s relation to Faulkner’s tale of racial empire building, Absalom, Absalom!

Home: A Conversation with Richard Powers and Tom LeClair

2008-03-09

Scott Hermanson presents a dialogue he conducted with novelists Richard Powers and Tom LeClair, at the University of Cincinnati in 2005. Moderated by Hermanson, the novelists discuss the intricacies of writing about nature, the role of history in the novel, and their fictions’ use of imitative form.

Either You're With Us and Against Us: Charles Bernstein's Girly Man, 9-11, and the Brechtian Figure of the Reader

2008-03-09

Tim Peterson brilliantly lays out for us how Charles Bernstein’s Girly Man represents the mobilization of queer rhetoric, iconoclastic values, and an implied notion of the family in the figure of the Girly Man.

Nothing Lasts

2008-03-04

In “Nothing Lasts,” Stephen Schryer considers Tom LeClair’s Passing On and The Liquidators as paired novels, one immersing the reader in the maelstrom of the social and economic systems that shape contemporary life, the other shielding the reader from those systems. Unlike the massive novels from the seventies that fascinated LeClair the critic, Schryer finds the novelist a “literary miniaturist,” seeking “concise synecdoches for the larger systems” his books evoke.

Beyond the String of Beads: More Systems for Game Narrative

2008-03-18

Monica Evans extends Costikyan’s analysis of the narrative/game debate, but ultimately concludes that battles over genre categorization miss the point of electronic media, and that we cannot yet accurately assess how the tension between story and play works out because digital games are “products of a technology still in its infancy.”

Dungeons, Dragons & Numerals: Jan Van Looy's Riposte to Erik Mona

2008-02-23

Jan Van Looy criticizes Erik Mona’s history of Dungeons & Dragons as overly descriptive, and Van Looy critiques the game’s quantification of the qualitative, i.e., personal characteristics and magic - which were hitherto considered unquantifiable.

One Story, Many Media

2008-01-27

Kevin Wilson describes his methodology of boiling a franchise down to its core elements and weighing the differences among media when translating games from medium to medium.

Design Decisions and Concepts in Licensed Collectible Card Games

2008-01-27

Eric Lang (with Pat Harrigan) explains the advantages writers have in crafting adaptations of literary franchises into collectible card games. Lang maintains that, while attempting to remain true to the original, when turning narratives into games, one must “respect the medium.”

On Mystery of the Abbey

2008-01-25

Bruno Faidutti begins with the controversial premise that “[e]very game tells a story,” in his description of how he uses literary techniques to enhance gameplay - even in non-RPG systems such as board games, which don’t traditionally include a story.

Structure and Meaning in Role-Playing Game Design

2008-01-20

Using Exalted as her text, Rebecca Borgstrom begins with the premises that every role-playing game requires a setting, and that to establish a fictional world players work within a mutually agreed upon structure to construct meaning.

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